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Enterprise Architecture & the Psychology of IT

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Enterprise Architecture & the Psychology of IT

This past summer, NPR did an interview [1] with an IT help desk professional, who stated that he and his team have “challenges where [they] have to counsel people and comfort them during stressful times while also practicing [their] craft.” The premise is highly relevant to the role of enterprise architects, and even CIOs.

IT’s role in the business is to leverage technology and data to help the organization accomplish more in less time (and at a profit) by:

  • Managing smart, strategically-driven applications
  • Providing tools and resources that support collaboration
  • Promoting a culture of critical thinking and problem solving
  • Predicting and managing the impact of changes to operations
  • Establishing metrics and reports that help executives make more-informed decisions

Unless you live under a rock, you know that taking the business digital (mobile, social, cloud, big data) has become the cornerstone of success. Customer needs and expectations are no longer completely satisfied by business practices that were considered forward-thinking in the mid-2000s. The relevance of psychology when considering the behaviors and emotions that are tethered to IT has fast-tracked innovation and the evolution of today’s business into tomorrow.

Here’s an interesting definition of the psychology of IT [2]:

Psychology of Information Technology
psy•chol•o•gy of in•for•ma•tion tech•nol•o•gy (noun)

1. an applied science study of the mental, attitudinal, motivational, or behavioral characteristics of an individual or of a type, class, or group of individuals in the development, maintenance, or use of computer systems, software and networks for the processing and distribution of data
2. the study of human behavior in relation to the generation, delivery, storage, use and sharing of electronic data

As an enterprise architect, you’re often faced with determining and navigating the “how”. By establishing a strong view from various specs, there should be a direct line from high level strategy straight down to the people who run the day to day activities. These are the activities that help implement the companies’ objectives that will support the overall business goals.

Without a solid understanding of your organization’s behavior and culture, determining and navigating the “how” is nearly impossible. In today’s business environment, CIOs should look to employ psychology-driven technologists.

Deloitte 2013 CIO Survey - Psychology Blog.jpg

Food for thought: This snapshot of the 2013 Deloitte CIO Survey demonstrates the importance of the connection between psychology and technology. CIOs find that IT is lacking in cognitive skills (critical thinking), but are fairly confident in the quantitative skills of IT (analytics). There are still significant shifts that have to take place in order to close the gap between cognitive and quantitative skills.

It’s imperative that companies seek software solutions that enhance their ability to connect technology and data to the human aspect of doing business. MEGA offers collaborative, scalable and secure solutions so that you can integrate the psychological and technological aspects of IT into the fabric of how your organization operates. What are you doing to bring the two together?

****

[1] http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2014/08/11/338984905/a-good-it-person-needs-to-be-half-technologist-half-psychologist
[2] http://www.purplecar.net/2013/07/psych-of-it/

Comment
Occasional Contributor

This past summer, NPR did an interview [1] with an IT help desk professional, who stated that he and his team have “challenges where [they] have to counsel people and comfort them during stressful times while also practicing [their] craft.” The premise is highly relevant to the role of enterprise architects, and even CIOs.

IT’s role in the business is to leverage technology and data to help the organization accomplish more in less time (and at a profit) by:

  • Managing smart, strategically-driven applications
  • Providing tools and resources that support collaboration
  • Promoting a culture of critical thinking and problem solving
  • Predicting and managing the impact of changes to operations
  • Establishing metrics and reports that help executives make more-informed decisions

Unless you live under a rock, you know that taking the business digital (mobile, social, cloud, big data) has become the cornerstone of success. Customer needs and expectations are no longer completely satisfied by business practices that were considered forward-thinking in the mid-2000s. The relevance of psychology when considering the behaviors and emotions that are tethered to IT has fast-tracked innovation and the evolution of today’s business into tomorrow.

Here’s an interesting definition of the psychology of IT [2]:

Psychology of Information Technology
psy•chol•o•gy of in•for•ma•tion tech•nol•o•gy (noun)

1. an applied science study of the mental, attitudinal, motivational, or behavioral characteristics of an individual or of a type, class, or group of individuals in the development, maintenance, or use of computer systems, software and networks for the processing and distribution of data
2. the study of human behavior in relation to the generation, delivery, storage, use and sharing of electronic data

As an enterprise architect, you’re often faced with determining and navigating the “how”. By establishing a strong view from various specs, there should be a direct line from high level strategy straight down to the people who run the day to day activities. These are the activities that help implement the companies’ objectives that will support the overall business goals.

Without a solid understanding of your organization’s behavior and culture, determining and navigating the “how” is nearly impossible. In today’s business environment, CIOs should look to employ psychology-driven technologists.

Deloitte 2013 CIO Survey - Psychology Blog.jpg

Food for thought: This snapshot of the 2013 Deloitte CIO Survey demonstrates the importance of the connection between psychology and technology. CIOs find that IT is lacking in cognitive skills (critical thinking), but are fairly confident in the quantitative skills of IT (analytics). There are still significant shifts that have to take place in order to close the gap between cognitive and quantitative skills.

It’s imperative that companies seek software solutions that enhance their ability to connect technology and data to the human aspect of doing business. MEGA offers collaborative, scalable and secure solutions so that you can integrate the psychological and technological aspects of IT into the fabric of how your organization operates. What are you doing to bring the two together?

****

[1] http://www.npr.org/blogs/alltechconsidered/2014/08/11/338984905/a-good-it-person-needs-to-be-half-te...
[2] http://www.purplecar.net/2013/07/psych-of-it/

2 Comments
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