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CIOs Be Selfish When Managing IT Strategy Delivery!

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Today, the digital footprint of the enterprise is the enterprise. How can companies make the best of this new deal? At best the C-Suite is ready… At worst, only next generation CIOs are prepared to ensure a secure transition and deliver the digital business while mitigating inherent risks.

Having seized the best of technological breakthroughs, CIOs have managed to push the company’s information system into their customers’ homes, eyes, ears, minds, in one word, into all sorts of mobile devices. Reversely, using the very same means, customers have also literally invited themselves inside the value chain via innovative digital business processes. And still, more traditional, “brick and mortar” processes continue to run.

All that is reflected in the company’s information system, where redundancies remain as reliefs of a past abundance, and now require drastic rationalization and legacy modernization. On top of that, CIOs need to provide digital customers with an unforgettable experience. To turn all these challenges into opportunities, not only should the enterprise capabilities be entirely redesigned, but CIOs need an innovation-centric IT roadmap aligned with the company’s strategy. At some point, all that must become concrete, timed, measurable.

No company can transform itself without deeply transforming its information system. All the more true when the business transformation consists of literally reversing and upturning the company so that the customer is built-in its very heart. CIOs need to secure their digital delivery part. They guide IT strategy delivery as a never ending scenario-based decision process, constantly trying to globally optimize the information system while only benefiting from partial viewpoints.

In an article published at the end of 2012, “Governing IT Governance: Key Strategies for the CIO”, Harvey Okin, Director, CIO Advisory outlines: “… proper governance is still a work in progress for many organizations. In fact, the 2012 CIO survey conducted by IDG Research Services for KPMG LLP asked CIOs about their areas of strength. Less than one-third cited IT governance, defined as “the ability to manage the IT solution, services and decision-making process”.

To succeed in their IT strategy delivery mission, as any of their peers around the board table, CIOs need support: they deserve the right compass, blueprints and decision making tools to design and select the best IT strategy delivery scenario. They need to ensure flexible and scalable solutions are available. They also need to manage and monitor the IT strategy delivery process itself. Does it take the company where it wants to be? Does it meet strategic objectives? And, above all, does the transformation ensure a continuous learning process about the end customer? Has business technology become a proactive component of the business strategy?

To answer these stringent questions, CIOs must be… selfish! More than any other board executive, CIOs deserve the best solutions to ensure IT strategy delivery is a success. They even must equip themselves first.

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Today, the digital footprint of the enterprise is the enterprise. How can companies make the best of this new deal? At best the C-Suite is ready… At worst, only next generation CIOs are prepared to ensure a secure transition and deliver the digital business while mitigating inherent risks.

Having seized the best of technological breakthroughs, CIOs have managed to push the company’s information system into their customers’ homes, eyes, ears, minds, in one word, into all sorts of mobile devices. Reversely, using the very same means, customers have also literally invited themselves inside the value chain via innovative digital business processes. And still, more traditional, “brick and mortar” processes continue to run.

All that is reflected in the company’s information system, where redundancies remain as reliefs of a past abundance, and now require drastic rationalization and legacy modernization. On top of that, CIOs need to provide digital customers with an unforgettable experience. To turn all these challenges into opportunities, not only should the enterprise capabilities be entirely redesigned, but CIOs need an innovation-centric IT roadmap aligned with the company’s strategy. At some point, all that must become concrete, timed, measurable.

No company can transform itself without deeply transforming its information system. All the more true when the business transformation consists of literally reversing and upturning the company so that the customer is built-in its very heart. CIOs need to secure their digital delivery part. They guide IT strategy delivery as a never ending scenario-based decision process, constantly trying to globally optimize the information system while only benefiting from partial viewpoints.

In an article published at the end of 2012, “Governing IT Governance: Key Strategies for the CIO”, Harvey Okin, Director, CIO Advisory outlines: “… proper governance is still a work in progress for many organizations. In fact, the 2012 CIO survey conducted by IDG Research Services for KPMG LLP asked CIOs about their areas of strength. Less than one-third cited IT governance, defined as “the ability to manage the IT solution, services and decision-making process”.

To succeed in their IT strategy delivery mission, as any of their peers around the board table, CIOs need support: they deserve the right compass, blueprints and decision making tools to design and select the best IT strategy delivery scenario. They need to ensure flexible and scalable solutions are available. They also need to manage and monitor the IT strategy delivery process itself. Does it take the company where it wants to be? Does it meet strategic objectives? And, above all, does the transformation ensure a continuous learning process about the end customer? Has business technology become a proactive component of the business strategy?

To answer these stringent questions, CIOs must be… selfish! More than any other board executive, CIOs deserve the best solutions to ensure IT strategy delivery is a success. They even must equip themselves first.