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Are You on the Business Architecture Trolley?

Are you on the Business Architecture trolley
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Know your onion (Be knowledgeable about a subject)

Decision makers, whether a 1920’s board of directors or a 2016 CIO, really have to know their onions about their organization. Business architecture would help them all because of the breadth and depth of information it provides, so they can be confident that the right choices are made regarding important decisions.

Business today is large and complex, with lots of moving parts and constant change. No one has the time or ability to do enough research on their own before every decision. Absent what business architecture can deliver … a united view of your challenges, drivers of change, customer expectations, your strategy, your resources, your capabilities, and the gaps you need to fill to reach your objectives … how can you be certain you have the right information to make the right decisions?

Get a hunch and bet a bunch—and all next week you’ll eat no lunch. (Making decisions based on intuition instead of data could produce dire results)

That’s what was said often at horse racetracks during the 1930’s. Some people rely on intuition to make decisions. But, would you buy a family car, choose a college or pick the locale for your vacation home without research? Probably not, so why rely on intuition for business decisions?

Using business architecture to build your team’s knowledge about the company will help you be better informed about:

  • your company’s current situation, the key drivers of change and future market direction
  • clear options that unite corporate goals, strategy, and operating models enterprise-wide
  • the capabilities your company requires, and which ones it has, as well as the gaps to fill

Don’t take any wooden nickels (Don’t get conned)

Tokens were issued in place of real money during financial crises: the Panic of 1837, the Civil War, the Depression. This phrase was a warning to be cautious about taking something less than genuine.

Execs today should think of wooden nickels when they’re sifting through reports and recommendations from staff. Without a strong business architecture program that helps your team deliver accurate, up-to-date, consistent information, how can you have faith in the recommendations?

You don’t want to make a sales or marketing decision based on incomplete information. Or ramp up production based on faulty numbers. These decisions require you to understand accurately the behavior and loyalty of customers … what they buy, how much, when, and where?

Business architecture can help you develop customer journey maps to guide you in improving the customer experience at all touchpoints along the journey. The results? More loyalty, more purchases and increased revenues.

A stitch in time saves nine (Putting in a little effort now will save a lot of work later)

You’ve heard this phrase, which dates back to the 1700’s. Today, we mean the same thing when we say to our teens, "Don’t procrastinate!".

Using your business architecture initiative to develop business roadmaps today can help you define the transformation stages your company needs to go through to meet the evolving demands of customers and market changes. By relying on the advantages business architecture can deliver to your company, you can save a lot of time, money, frustration and possibly failure later.

Now you’re on the trolley (Now you’ve got it!)

That’s slang from the 1920’s. If you take to heart some of these old time sayings and “jump on the bandwagon” of business architecture, you’ll be making better decisions.

"Jump on the bandwagon" was from P.T. Barnum, referring to his 1850’s showy circus bandwagons that were so popular that politicians started to ride them in parades and warn people not to jump on the opponent’s bandwagon.

MEGA has a business architecture bandwagon that’s used by people who know their onion, don’t bet on a hunch, don’t take wooden nickels and did their stitch in time. Maybe you should jump on it with them.

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New Member

Know your onion (Be knowledgeable about a subject)

Decision makers, whether a 1920’s board of directors or a 2016 CIO, really have to know their onions about their organization. Business architecture would help them all because of the breadth and depth of information it provides, so they can be confident that the right choices are made regarding important decisions.

Business today is large and complex, with lots of moving parts and constant change. No one has the time or ability to do enough research on their own before every decision. Absent what business architecture can deliver … a united view of your challenges, drivers of change, customer expectations, your strategy, your resources, your capabilities, and the gaps you need to fill to reach your objectives … how can you be certain you have the right information to make the right decisions?

Get a hunch and bet a bunch—and all next week you’ll eat no lunch. (Making decisions based on intuition instead of data could produce dire results)

That’s what was said often at horse racetracks during the 1930’s. Some people rely on intuition to make decisions. But, would you buy a family car, choose a college or pick the locale for your vacation home without research? Probably not, so why rely on intuition for business decisions?

Using business architecture to build your team’s knowledge about the company will help you be better informed about:

  • your company’s current situation, the key drivers of change and future market direction
  • clear options that unite corporate goals, strategy, and operating models enterprise-wide
  • the capabilities your company requires, and which ones it has, as well as the gaps to fill

Don’t take any wooden nickels (Don’t get conned)

Tokens were issued in place of real money during financial crises: the Panic of 1837, the Civil War, the Depression. This phrase was a warning to be cautious about taking something less than genuine.

Execs today should think of wooden nickels when they’re sifting through reports and recommendations from staff. Without a strong business architecture program that helps your team deliver accurate, up-to-date, consistent information, how can you have faith in the recommendations?

You don’t want to make a sales or marketing decision based on incomplete information. Or ramp up production based on faulty numbers. These decisions require you to understand accurately the behavior and loyalty of customers … what they buy, how much, when, and where?

Business architecture can help you develop customer journey maps to guide you in improving the customer experience at all touchpoints along the journey. The results? More loyalty, more purchases and increased revenues.

A stitch in time saves nine (Putting in a little effort now will save a lot of work later)

You’ve heard this phrase, which dates back to the 1700’s. Today, we mean the same thing when we say to our teens, "Don’t procrastinate!".

Using your business architecture initiative to develop business roadmaps today can help you define the transformation stages your company needs to go through to meet the evolving demands of customers and market changes. By relying on the advantages business architecture can deliver to your company, you can save a lot of time, money, frustration and possibly failure later.

Now you’re on the trolley (Now you’ve got it!)

That’s slang from the 1920’s. If you take to heart some of these old time sayings and “jump on the bandwagon” of business architecture, you’ll be making better decisions.

"Jump on the bandwagon" was from P.T. Barnum, referring to his 1850’s showy circus bandwagons that were so popular that politicians started to ride them in parades and warn people not to jump on the opponent’s bandwagon.

MEGA has a business architecture bandwagon that’s used by people who know their onion, don’t bet on a hunch, don’t take wooden nickels and did their stitch in time. Maybe you should jump on it with them.