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In It to Win IT: Fantasy Football & Enterprise Architecture

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In It to Win IT: Fantasy Football & Enterprise Architecture

Because of the big-picture, long-term vision that enterprise architects can provide, those that think like seasoned enterprise architects will be the real threat this year in the company Fantasy pool. Sure, it’s great to pick up the players that you know will deliver immediate value and score high in week one and two, but often, by week three the defense has figured them out, their value has run its course, and you’re back to the waiver wire, duct taping a roster together - desperate for points.
Business is a lot like fantasy football in that you have to prepare and manage the things you can control, but also be aware that changes and disruptions will occur. You’ll want to have an infrastructure in place to be able to react with agility and stay competitive [1] week after week. When you are designing your EA model, it’s fantastic to be able to deliver value right away, just be careful you don’t architect your model exclusively for a specific deliverable. This narrow thinking can get your department into trouble when you are asked to support the next change within your organization.  It’s time to start thinking long term; it’s time to practice enterprise architecture that can support the agile business world we live in.

As a consultant working with customers to achieve short-term goals and long-term success, I like to recommend that they consider the following questions:

1. Are your architecture initiatives supporting the current business goals[2]?

2. Does it limit the company’s flexibility and ability to be agile in the future?

3. What value will this provide to the business?

If we get too fixated on a single report or change, without considering the points above, the purpose can get lost. A narrow focus can be good for making sure we’re hitting all the details, big and small. But if we lose sight of the big picture, it can tremendously decrease the long term value of architecture initiatives, which will make supporting digital transformation, strategy, and road mapping very difficult for your organization.

It is impossible to predict every potential obstacle, like player injuries, trades, etc. Having a Fantasy Football roster that can adjust to any week’s matchup is what will win you the season, and having an EA practice that can deliver value to stakeholders by staying competitive both today AND tomorrow will get you your season victory.

[1] Architecting for change, Mark Richards, Posted on 25.03.14 on NDC Magazine
[2] What CIOs Need to Know About Business Alignment, by Dennis Mc Cafferty, Posted on 02.11.2014 on CIO Insights

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Senior Member

Because of the big-picture, long-term vision that enterprise architects can provide, those that think like seasoned enterprise architects will be the real threat this year in the company Fantasy pool. Sure, it’s great to pick up the players that you know will deliver immediate value and score high in week one and two, but often, by week three the defense has figured them out, their value has run its course, and you’re back to the waiver wire, duct taping a roster together - desperate for points.
Business is a lot like fantasy football in that you have to prepare and manage the things you can control, but also be aware that changes and disruptions will occur. You’ll want to have an infrastructure in place to be able to react with agility and stay competitive [1] week after week. When you are designing your EA model, it’s fantastic to be able to deliver value right away, just be careful you don’t architect your model exclusively for a specific deliverable. This narrow thinking can get your department into trouble when you are asked to support the next change within your organization.  It’s time to start thinking long term; it’s time to practice enterprise architecture that can support the agile business world we live in.

As a consultant working with customers to achieve short-term goals and long-term success, I like to recommend that they consider the following questions:

1. Are your architecture initiatives supporting the current business goals[2]?

2. Does it limit the company’s flexibility and ability to be agile in the future?

3. What value will this provide to the business?

If we get too fixated on a single report or change, without considering the points above, the purpose can get lost. A narrow focus can be good for making sure we’re hitting all the details, big and small. But if we lose sight of the big picture, it can tremendously decrease the long term value of architecture initiatives, which will make supporting digital transformation, strategy, and road mapping very difficult for your organization.

It is impossible to predict every potential obstacle, like player injuries, trades, etc. Having a Fantasy Football roster that can adjust to any week’s matchup is what will win you the season, and having an EA practice that can deliver value to stakeholders by staying competitive both today AND tomorrow will get you your season victory.

[1] Architecting for change, Mark Richards, Posted on 25.03.14 on NDC Magazine
[2] What CIOs Need to Know About Business Alignment, by Dennis Mc Cafferty, Posted on 02.11.2014 on CIO Insights

1 Comment
Chace Howlandff
N/A

This guy is on to something. It's all about consistency!