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What to improve first: product or customer experience?

improve product or customer experience?
14090
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Let’s take the example of a pizza chain that wants to increase its market share. The board decides they will select from one of two strategies:

  • Change the pizza recipe to potentially appeal to a broader market
  • Redesign the delivery experience.

If the company decides to change the pizza recipe, some additional costs may occur. And this will not necessarily help the company differentiate itself from the competition. This improvement may have in fact very little impact on its customers, already torn between multiple offerings from other pizza chains.

On the contrary, if the pizza chain instead focuses on the buying journey of its customers and creates an innovative shopping experience, the company is more likely to retain those customers and attract new ones.

Let’s suppose the pizza chain has identified that the waiting time to place an order by telephone is a critical moment in the customer's buying journey. If it takes too long, the customer will hang up and call a competitor for their pizza.

To help solve this issue, the pizza chain can develop a mobile app allowing customers to order pizzas directly from this application. The application will also provide enhanced services like remembering previous orders under a “Favorites” menu or offering to use your phone’s current location as the delivery destination.

Once the order is placed, users can track the preparation and the delivery of their order in real time, and then rate and share their experience on the pizza chain’s website and social media pages. By doing so, the pizza chain will be able to send personalized news and promotions thereafter and increase customer loyalty, as well as improve its knowledge of its buyers’ personas.

In another industry, some companies in the field of cosmetics have experienced a significant growth of their makeup product line by developing a mobile application that allows users to test makeups in a virtual mirror using augmented reality. Users can then place orders directly from the application, which automatically triggers a delivery process.

We could cite other industries where companies have completely redefined their customer experience, but these two examples are sufficient to demonstrate that putting customer experience at the heart of a company’s strategy has become critical.

So how to define, or redefine, customer experience?

To do this, you should accurately map your customers’ buying journey by identifying the touchpoints between your customers and the brand, and do this through various channels and throughout the buying cycle. At each touchpoint, you should be able to determine the level of customer satisfaction to better understand customer expectations and satisfy them. You can also determine the moments of truth in the customer journey when a customer might exit the buying cycle, and then focus on them to improve customer satisfaction and retention.

By combining customer journey and business process analysis, processes are directly connected to customer experience. For example, when a customer orders a product online, this triggers a whole logistics process which consists of first sending the purchased item, and then replenishing the product, and customer experience will vary depending on how well the process is executed.

Thus, by integrating customer journey mapping with business processes, companies get the means to succeed in a competitive environment. In today’s world, companies that wouldn’t put customer experience in their agenda face the risk of becoming less attractive and losing competitiveness even though they may have the best products.

To learn more download our eBook “Plan Business Transformation and Improve Customer Experience” .

14090
0
Comment

Let’s take the example of a pizza chain that wants to increase its market share. The board decides they will select from one of two strategies:

  • Change the pizza recipe to potentially appeal to a broader market
  • Redesign the delivery experience.

If the company decides to change the pizza recipe, some additional costs may occur. And this will not necessarily help the company differentiate itself from the competition. This improvement may have in fact very little impact on its customers, already torn between multiple offerings from other pizza chains.

On the contrary, if the pizza chain instead focuses on the buying journey of its customers and creates an innovative shopping experience, the company is more likely to retain those customers and attract new ones.

Let’s suppose the pizza chain has identified that the waiting time to place an order by telephone is a critical moment in the customer's buying journey. If it takes too long, the customer will hang up and call a competitor for their pizza.

To help solve this issue, the pizza chain can develop a mobile app allowing customers to order pizzas directly from this application. The application will also provide enhanced services like remembering previous orders under a “Favorites” menu or offering to use your phone’s current location as the delivery destination.

Once the order is placed, users can track the preparation and the delivery of their order in real time, and then rate and share their experience on the pizza chain’s website and social media pages. By doing so, the pizza chain will be able to send personalized news and promotions thereafter and increase customer loyalty, as well as improve its knowledge of its buyers’ personas.

In another industry, some companies in the field of cosmetics have experienced a significant growth of their makeup product line by developing a mobile application that allows users to test makeups in a virtual mirror using augmented reality. Users can then place orders directly from the application, which automatically triggers a delivery process.

We could cite other industries where companies have completely redefined their customer experience, but these two examples are sufficient to demonstrate that putting customer experience at the heart of a company’s strategy has become critical.

So how to define, or redefine, customer experience?

To do this, you should accurately map your customers’ buying journey by identifying the touchpoints between your customers and the brand, and do this through various channels and throughout the buying cycle. At each touchpoint, you should be able to determine the level of customer satisfaction to better understand customer expectations and satisfy them. You can also determine the moments of truth in the customer journey when a customer might exit the buying cycle, and then focus on them to improve customer satisfaction and retention.

By combining customer journey and business process analysis, processes are directly connected to customer experience. For example, when a customer orders a product online, this triggers a whole logistics process which consists of first sending the purchased item, and then replenishing the product, and customer experience will vary depending on how well the process is executed.

Thus, by integrating customer journey mapping with business processes, companies get the means to succeed in a competitive environment. In today’s world, companies that wouldn’t put customer experience in their agenda face the risk of becoming less attractive and losing competitiveness even though they may have the best products.

To learn more download our eBook “Plan Business Transformation and Improve Customer Experience” .