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MEGA UK Charity Walk

UK Charity Walk Blog Picture.jpg
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The traditions of the UK Charity Walk

Taylor was self-opinionated, stubborn and worked hard at anything he decided to do both in and out of work.

The MEGA team decided that they needed to do something to both honour Taylor’s memory and to ‘take a stand’ against this horrible disease. We talked about the sort of thing that Taylor would be part of and agreed it had to be tough, involve a team and raise money for charity.

After some discussion, we decided we would attempt the UK Three Peaks Challenge. This involves both climbing the three highest peaks in the UK and more importantly doing so within a 24-hour period. Any of the three mountains are a significant walk in themselves, but the three together, the logistics of getting between them and the inevitable lack of sleep within the 24-hours means it’s a true test of both fitness and resolve.

I’m proud to say the UK team completed the challenge successfully and raised significant funds in the process. It’s also worth noting that many of the team that took part in the challenge weren’t necessarily ‘outdoors people’, hadn’t undertaken serious hill walking before, or in some cases ever been to Scotland! A combination of training walks, fitness training and a close-knit team all pulled together to both prepare and execute on the day. It was a draining and emotional experience, but above all proud team that completed the challenge and vowed to keep Taylor’s name alive.

In 2015 a team again formed and walked a significant section of the UK’s Jurassic Coast. Continual gradients, changeable weather and serious distances were all overcome by the team whilst raising funds in the process for Brain Tumour Research. Of note by this stage is that the team was no longer just made up of people who knew Taylor or who are based in the UK… now we had people walking in Taylor’s memory and reputation from both the UK and MEGA headquarters in Paris.

Summer 2016 saw a new international team from both MEGA UK and headquarters assemble and attack the top third of the 95mile long Scotland’s West Highland Way. This route runs from just outside Glasgow to Fort William. The route is made up of non-surfaced tracks and covers a huge variety of gradients with the ever-changeable Scottish weather adding an air of excitement! 19 miles of walking on the first day and 17 on the second saw the team across the finish line. More charity funds were raised and many new friendships and bonds were formed – Taylor I’m sure is proud.

About Brain Tumour Research

Brain tumours kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer …  yet just 1% of the national spend on cancer research has been allocated to this fight devastating disease. This is unacceptable!

The Brain Tumour Research charity works hard to make a difference.

Carol Robertson, Head of Community Fundraising for Brain Tumour Research, said: “We are extremely grateful to the Mega International UK team, and wish them all the best for a successful event. We hope as many people as possible will support their endeavour, or even consider holding their own events, helping us to spread the word about this terrible disease.”

To donate

If you would like to donate to this great cause, you can do so via our JustGiving page via this link

Funds raised will help develop the charity’s network of world-class brain tumour research centres in the UK.

We’ll post pictures and updates during our trek, and thank you for your great support! #MEGAUKCharityWalk

48771
3
Comment
BB-Mega
Retired

The traditions of the UK Charity Walk

Taylor was self-opinionated, stubborn and worked hard at anything he decided to do both in and out of work.

The MEGA team decided that they needed to do something to both honour Taylor’s memory and to ‘take a stand’ against this horrible disease. We talked about the sort of thing that Taylor would be part of and agreed it had to be tough, involve a team and raise money for charity.

After some discussion, we decided we would attempt the UK Three Peaks Challenge. This involves both climbing the three highest peaks in the UK and more importantly doing so within a 24-hour period. Any of the three mountains are a significant walk in themselves, but the three together, the logistics of getting between them and the inevitable lack of sleep within the 24-hours means it’s a true test of both fitness and resolve.

I’m proud to say the UK team completed the challenge successfully and raised significant funds in the process. It’s also worth noting that many of the team that took part in the challenge weren’t necessarily ‘outdoors people’, hadn’t undertaken serious hill walking before, or in some cases ever been to Scotland! A combination of training walks, fitness training and a close-knit team all pulled together to both prepare and execute on the day. It was a draining and emotional experience, but above all proud team that completed the challenge and vowed to keep Taylor’s name alive.

In 2015 a team again formed and walked a significant section of the UK’s Jurassic Coast. Continual gradients, changeable weather and serious distances were all overcome by the team whilst raising funds in the process for Brain Tumour Research. Of note by this stage is that the team was no longer just made up of people who knew Taylor or who are based in the UK… now we had people walking in Taylor’s memory and reputation from both the UK and MEGA headquarters in Paris.

Summer 2016 saw a new international team from both MEGA UK and headquarters assemble and attack the top third of the 95mile long Scotland’s West Highland Way. This route runs from just outside Glasgow to Fort William. The route is made up of non-surfaced tracks and covers a huge variety of gradients with the ever-changeable Scottish weather adding an air of excitement! 19 miles of walking on the first day and 17 on the second saw the team across the finish line. More charity funds were raised and many new friendships and bonds were formed – Taylor I’m sure is proud.

About Brain Tumour Research

Brain tumours kill more children and adults under the age of 40 than any other cancer …  yet just 1% of the national spend on cancer research has been allocated to this fight devastating disease. This is unacceptable!

The Brain Tumour Research charity works hard to make a difference.

Carol Robertson, Head of Community Fundraising for Brain Tumour Research, said: “We are extremely grateful to the Mega International UK team, and wish them all the best for a successful event. We hope as many people as possible will support their endeavour, or even consider holding their own events, helping us to spread the word about this terrible disease.”

To donate

If you would like to donate to this great cause, you can do so via our JustGiving page via this link

Funds raised will help develop the charity’s network of world-class brain tumour research centres in the UK.

We’ll post pictures and updates during our trek, and thank you for your great support! #MEGAUKCharityWalk

3 Comments
JamieKnowles
New Member

Well done guys!

Felicitations!

BB-Mega
Retired

Having successfully completed another year of our annual charity walk and raising a whopping 157% (£2,377) of our target, Lorne Clark shares his thoughts. @clark 

 

walk.jfif

 

We started doing these walks getting on for 10 years ago now.   The first was the National Three Peaks Challenge and it wasn’t so long after Taylor’s funeral.

 

To say things at the end of the National Three Peaks were emotional would be an understatement.  The walk itself was a physical challenge – the distance, trying to sleep in a minibus between mountains and of course the pressure to get it down in the 24 hours…

 

Over the years we’ve changed the type of walk to some more endurance, the timescales and the general format and even the country – all the time conscious that it had to be something Taylor himself would be happy to participate in…

 

This year then, after a Covid-based gap, it was ‘back to basics’ – a hard walk against the clock and I’ll be honest, a little more pressure after the break.   Putting together the walking team and organising by the newest member of the team as is tradition, we hit some challenges.   Finding accommodation, a guide, health and fitness challenges and even a last-minute substitution all made for additional pressure.

 

In my head it wouldn’t be as hard as the National Three Peaks… how wrong was I!?   We were blessed on the day with warm, but not hot weather and set off nice and early.   A fairly blunt safety brief before we hit the trail brought things into perspective.   When our guide (a serving Royal Marine) tells you this is a hard walk and goes through the fallbacks for minor and major injury scenarios … well it focuses the mind.    When he also explains he’s asked a couple of assistants along as the logistics mean he will need some help should any of these things happen… again you listen a little bit more carefully.

 

It's just a day out walking right?  No, you’re walking for a solid 12 hours, there is little time to stop to even take a pic and you’re rarely flat – always ascending or descending.    In fact, each of the three Mountains is itself a ‘day out’.   One thing that hadn’t crossed my mind at all – it isn’t up one mountain and a ridge to the next – it's three separate mountains and long walks between each – fully up and down each in turn.  

 

Over the course of the day we saw some dehydration, some very very badly blistered and bruised ankles, a groin strain and near tears of joy to find a vending machine between mountain 2 and 3.   Being able to see the cars, and an open pub between each mountain means you have to be pretty committed to just carry on.   

 

The summary – we did it.   We got it done and I stood outside our accommodation in the last of the light in the day – and remembered Taylor.

 

Now… what are we going to do next year?