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Improve Decision-Making with Enterprise Architecture

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This makes me feel like the character in Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken" who stands at the intersection of two roads in the woods and ponders on which one to take. He ends up choosing randomly because the two roads are similar. The traveler promises to go down the other path another day, but he certainly won’t have the opportunity to do so, because his choice of roads will lead him to other intersections and other decisions. The poem ends with a nostalgic note, wondering how things would have been if he had chosen the other option.

Frost’s poem deals with decision-making: how do we know we have all the information we need to make the correct decision? Of course, not all decisions are equally difficult. In fact, I see three main categories:

  • Decision-making where uncertainty is null: e.g. deciding to take a road at an intersection when there is a one-way sign that clearly indicates the direction.
  • Decision-making where uncertainty is limited or quantifiable. This is the case, for example, where several routes are possible and uncertainty can be reduced with the help of a map or a GPS. There is still a margin for error since the traveler may not have all of the information he'd like to have (e.g. Are there steep climbs? How is the view?)
  • Finally, the last category concerns decisions where uncertainty is infinite. Perhaps this would be the case when night falls without any GPS, map or sign. We are left to our own instinct to choose the right road!

We all face decision-making, both in our personal lives and in our professional lives. And executives must often decide when uncertainty is high. For example, today many companies are at cross roads wondering how they can be sure they are making the right choices when initiating a digital transformation project.

Enterprise architecture can function as a GPS and guide a company in its choices, reducing uncertainty and providing the right information to properly assess the different possibilities.

At the business level, enterprise architecture enables companies to define their strategy and clarify their vision, mission and objectives by assessing the drivers of change such as business or regulatory drivers.

Enterprise architecture allows companies to plan the business capabilities they need to achieve their objectives, and helps define a strategy and tactics to achieve each objective.

Once business capabilities are planned, IT departments can develop the required IT assets, including applications, technologies and infrastructure to support business efforts.

Enterprise architecture provides organizations with clear business and IT roadmaps that leave little room for uncertainty. Coupled with business and IT risk management, enterprise architecture reduces the risks inherent in any transformation by assessing their impact and likelihood, and by implementing action plans to reduce these risks.

In conclusion, companies can improve strategic decision-making and reduce uncertainty thanks to enterprise architecture. Enterprise architecture works as a GPS that allows organizations to build and communicate a clear and accurate roadmap, and helps us understand better what we should do when faced with strategic choices.

 

Follow this link to read the french version of this post. 

Comment
MEGA

This makes me feel like the character in Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken" who stands at the intersection of two roads in the woods and ponders on which one to take. He ends up choosing randomly because the two roads are similar. The traveler promises to go down the other path another day, but he certainly won’t have the opportunity to do so, because his choice of roads will lead him to other intersections and other decisions. The poem ends with a nostalgic note, wondering how things would have been if he had chosen the other option.

Frost’s poem deals with decision-making: how do we know we have all the information we need to make the correct decision? Of course, not all decisions are equally difficult. In fact, I see three main categories:

  • Decision-making where uncertainty is null: e.g. deciding to take a road at an intersection when there is a one-way sign that clearly indicates the direction.
  • Decision-making where uncertainty is limited or quantifiable. This is the case, for example, where several routes are possible and uncertainty can be reduced with the help of a map or a GPS. There is still a margin for error since the traveler may not have all of the information he'd like to have (e.g. Are there steep climbs? How is the view?)
  • Finally, the last category concerns decisions where uncertainty is infinite. Perhaps this would be the case when night falls without any GPS, map or sign. We are left to our own instinct to choose the right road!

We all face decision-making, both in our personal lives and in our professional lives. And executives must often decide when uncertainty is high. For example, today many companies are at cross roads wondering how they can be sure they are making the right choices when initiating a digital transformation project.

Enterprise architecture can function as a GPS and guide a company in its choices, reducing uncertainty and providing the right information to properly assess the different possibilities.

At the business level, enterprise architecture enables companies to define their strategy and clarify their vision, mission and objectives by assessing the drivers of change such as business or regulatory drivers.

Enterprise architecture allows companies to plan the business capabilities they need to achieve their objectives, and helps define a strategy and tactics to achieve each objective.

Once business capabilities are planned, IT departments can develop the required IT assets, including applications, technologies and infrastructure to support business efforts.

Enterprise architecture provides organizations with clear business and IT roadmaps that leave little room for uncertainty. Coupled with business and IT risk management, enterprise architecture reduces the risks inherent in any transformation by assessing their impact and likelihood, and by implementing action plans to reduce these risks.

In conclusion, companies can improve strategic decision-making and reduce uncertainty thanks to enterprise architecture. Enterprise architecture works as a GPS that allows organizations to build and communicate a clear and accurate roadmap, and helps us understand better what we should do when faced with strategic choices.

 

Follow this link to read the french version of this post.